Online Fitness Coaching: Getting Fit in Spite of Cancer

As I write this post Penn State University is holding THON one of the biggest student fundraisers in the nation for The Four Diamonds Fund.  Money (78 million to date) goes to Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital to help fight childhood cancer.   It seems like the perfect time to welcome my next guest blogger, David Haas. He has some great online fitness coaching  for those of you who may be fighting cancer.  If you know or love someone who is fighting the cancer battle, point them to this post. 

Getting Fit In Spite of Cancer

Whether you are recovering mesothelioma treatment or your treatment is still in progress, you may find that you are feeling listless, frustrated and constantly fatigued. While there is no magic formula that will make that all go away, you will find that you can mitigate some of the symptoms through exercise. According to the National Cancer Institute, a panel of 13 experts in fields ranging from exercise training to cancer stated that one of the most important things that a cancer patient or survivor can do is to avoid inactivity. This is news that can change the way that you look at your recovery.

In the first place, one thing that cancer survivors have to think about is what they are capable of. If you worked out a great deal before your diagnosis, you may want to go immediately back to where you were. In many cases, this is not possible, though you may find that you can get back there eventually. While this is disappointing, one way that many people get through this is by thinking that they are doing more than they were yesterday. Take some time to think about what your options are in this regard and what kind of exercises you might want to resume.

If you are thinking that you have never worked out before, you will find that this is a good time to start. Not only does working out allow you to reassert control over your body, you will also find that it releases endorphins that allow you to feel good. This release of adrenaline is a great way to burn off the stress that so often goes with cancer treatment, even after a full recovery has been affected. If you have never really exercised before, speak with a doctor and discuss what your options might be and what you can do to make sure that you are not going to hurt yourself.

Remember that it is okay to start small. There are plenty of people who find that just a walk up and down the street is what they can handle at first. Push yourself a little, but remember to take care of yourself as well. Exercising allows you to stay in tune with your body and to put it to work for you. So many people think that they are prisoners in their body, but the truth is that it is a tool. It may not always work well, but it is yours and you can sharpen and refine it.

Take some time to learn more about what kind of exercises are going to work best for you. This is a wonderful time get back in control, no matter where in your treatment you are. Consider how you can work out and fend off feelings of fear and worry.

About the Author

Joining the organization in 2011, David Haas is a cancer support group and  awareness program advocate at the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance. In addition to  researching the many valuable programs available to our site’s visitors, David  often blogs about programs and campaigns underway at the Mesothelioma Cancer  Alliance, as well as creative fitness ideas for those dealing with cancer, while  creating relationships with similar organizations.

David can be reached at dhaas@mesotheliomacanceralliance.org

Read more: http://www.mesothelioma.com/blog/authors/david/bio.htm#ixzz1mlcBn5ZY

 

On-line Fitness Coach: Exercise is Good for Cancer Patients

Please welcome Liz Davies, my very first guest blogger!  Exercise is great for relieving stress, improving self-confidence and keeping you strong when you are healthy, but it becomes very important if you are fighting disease.  Take it away Liz..

Fight Cancer with Exercise

Physical activity produces a variety of benefits for people suffering from cancer, just as it would for people who aren’t experiencing the disease. A daily exercise routine gives people a way to stay active, maintain a healthy weight and grow to be more muscular. In addition to these rewards, physical activity increases positivity and self-confidence while lowering exhaustion and the threat for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is pertinent for people undergoing cancer treatments to make sure they remain active; starting just about any type of exercise advances healing. This is true no matter what type of cancer someone is dealing with, whether that is colon cancer or mesothelioma!
It is also recommended to consult a professional before embarking on a daily
exercise routine. There are also many licensed cancer exercise professionals
that can be of great assistance and can tailor individual exercise programs.

Patients who have no prior experience exercising can start
with stretching exercises. Any movement that fosters mobility is a great if the
patient is not ready for a more intense workout program. Yoga, tai chi, and
pilates are different forms of stretching exercises that are wonderful for
movement and can be easily altered for any level of physical ability.

For people who are accustomed to more activity, cardio
exercises, like swimming, running and even walking are a great way to receive
benefits from working out. These activities burn calories while increasing lung
capacity and decrease people’s odds of having a stroke, heart attack or
diabetes.

Resistance training, like weight lifting, should also not be ignored. These exercises
will help cancer patients gain muscle which is very important because
treatments like chemotherapy and radiation often cause muscle loss. Ideally it
is important to include both cardio and strength training into a daily exercise
routine.

Motivation can be hard to find when you have an obstacle
like cancer standing in the way. This may be an overwhelming feeling and if so
adding some simple activities to a daily routine can be a good way to start.
Putting away groceries, taking the stairs instead of the escalator, or buying a
pedometer to monitor activity is a good step in the right direction. With ideas
like this it is very important that all cancer patients are experiencing some
type of activity to ensure that they are optimizing the result of their
treatment.

Liz Davies is a recent college graduate and aspiring writer especially interested
in health and wellness. She wants to make a difference in people’s lives because she sees how cancer has devastated so many people in this world. Liz also likes running,
playing lacrosse, reading and playing with her dog, April.